My Bikes

I own several bikes, as a full time guide I think it is important to have the right tool for the job at hand. In general I run a lighter, snappier shorter travel bike as my trail bike, I have a burlier “enduro” style bike for the more challenging trails in Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton and I have a pump track bike for fun and a fat bike to keep me rolling (and sane) in winter, here they are:

The Trail (Chilcotin) bike: This year I have updated to a 2020 Norco Optic C9 SRAM Custom build as part of my bicycle garage. This is a replacement for my 2019 Norco Sight C9 ‘trail’ bike. Once again it is an XL frame, this time in Metallic Purple/ Charcoal Grey colour scheme. I continue my experiment with a full SRAM/ Rockshox build. 

It is overforked with a 2020 Rockshox Lyrik Ultimate 150mm with 42mm offset (short) with a 2020 Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate DH rear shock which has externally adjustable, low speed rebound and compression and delivers a well balanced, high traction ride. 

The drive train is the new SRAM Eagle XO1 AXS (wireless shifting) with Cane creek eeWings titanium 170 mm cranks with a Stages Cycling power meter paired with a non-boost, Wolf tooth Components CAMO spider and an elliptical, stainless steel 30T chain ring. It runs on the new Cane creek Hellbender bottom bracket which has the SKF solid lube technology. The crankset drives an XX1 Eagle Rainbow chain on the XG-1299 Rainbow 10-50T cassette. I help the chain stay in place with a OneUp Components V2 Chain guide. I continue to trust the Crank brothers Mallet E LS pedals as they seem to be the best pedals to deal with the Chilcotin lava ash. 

The wheel set has evolved to the 2020 We Are One Revolution Union/ Faction 29” fully custom wheel set; I am running the Union rim (inner width 30 mm) on the front and the Faction rim (inner width 27 mm) on the rear, built with Sapim CX-Ray spokes laced to the new Industry Nine Hydra ISO6 XD boost hubs. The tyres are my ever reliable Continental Der Baron Projekt Protection Apex 2.4″.  The slightly narrower rear rim gives the rear tyre a slightly rounder profile.

The controls are a SQ-Labs 30X 45 mm rise carbon handle bar which has 12º sweep (trimmed to 760 mm) mated to a 9point8 Stout 40 mm (0º rise) stem. I have switched grips to OneUp Components single lock ring grips for their tackiness in all kinds of weather. I have a SQ-Labs 611 Active (hard elastomer) S-tube 13cm saddle. Saddle height is managed by a Rockshox Reverb AXS 31.6 mm x 170 mm dropper. 

Finally braking is provided by SRAM Code RSC brakes, fitted with a rainbow bolt kit, with metal pads and six bolt Centreline rotors, 200 mm on the front and 180 mm on the rear. My minimalist CNC brake adaptors are from Trickstuff and everything, as far as possible, is assembled with rainbow Ti bolts, from Vidiom Graphics, to reduce the chance of rust and seizing. This bike has a full custom metallic AXS rainbow sticker package from StikRD and is covered in protective film by Ridewrap.

This bike is a complete change from the 2019 model Optic which was a little too short travel for my guided trip riding, especially negotiating steep, loose, technical trails whilst wearing a heavy guide pack. It has also benefitted from having a longer wheel base (1275 mm; +49mm), a steeper (76º; +2.8º) seat tube and a slacker head angle (65º; -1.5º) designed to use a shorter off set fork than the 2019 Sight. It handles even better than the 2019 Sight (All Mountain) bike.

2020 Norco Sight SRAM/ Quarq/ We Are One Custom

The All Mountain (Whistler) bike: This year I updated to a 2020 Norco Sight C9 SRAM Custom build as part of my bicycle garage. This is a replacement for my 2018 Range ‘enduro’ bike. Once again it is an XL frame, this time in Green/ Jade colour scheme (actually a metallic British Racing Green with Spring Green details). I continue my experiment with a full SRAM/ Rockshox build. 

It has been over-forked with a 2020 Rockshox Lyrik Ultimate 170mm with 42mm offset (short) with a 2020 Rockshox Super Deluxe Select + rear shock has externally adjustable, low speed rebound and delivers a well balanced, high traction ride. 

The drive train is the new SRAM Eagle X01 AXS (wireless shifting) with SRAM Quarq XX1 Eagle DUB power meter 170 mm crank set, SRAM DUB bottom bracket and a 32T X-Sync 2 chain ring. This drives an XX1 Eagle Rainbow chain and XG-1299 Rainbow 10-50T cassette. I retain my trusty OneUp Components V2 Chain bash guard. I continue to trust the Crankbrothers Mallet E LS pedals as they seem to be the best pedals to deal with the Chilcotin lava ash. 

The wheel set has evolved to a We Are One Revolution Union/ Faction 29” fully custom wheel set; I am running the Union rim (inner width 30 mm) on the front and the Faction rim (inner width 27 mm) on the rear, built with Sapim CX-Ray spokes laced to the new Industry Nine Hydra ISO6 XD boost hubs. The tyres are my ever reliable Continental Der Baron Projekt Protection Apex 2.4″. 

The controls are a SQ-Labs 30X 30 mm rise carbon handle bar which has 12º sweep (trimmed to 780 mm) mated to a 9point8 Stout 30 mm (0º rise) Stem. I have switched grips to OneUp Components single lock ring grips for their tackiness in all kinds of weather. I have a SQ-Labs 611 Active (hard elastomer) S-tube 13cm saddle. Saddle height is managed by a Rockshox Reverb AXS 31.6 mm x 170 mm dropper., installed with a Canecreek 31.6 – 34.9 aluminium shim. 

Finally braking is provided by SRAM Code RSC brakes with metal pads and six bolt Centreline rotors, 200 mm on the front and 180 mm on the rear. My minimalist CNC brake adaptors are from Trickstuff and everything, as far as possible, is assembled with Ti bolts, from Vidiom Graphics, to reduce the chance of rust and seizing. It is covered in protective film by Ridewrap.

This bike is a complete redesign when compared to the 2019 model Sight, with a longer wheel base (1301 mm; + 52mm), a steeper (78º; +4.5º) seat tube and a slacker head angle (65º; -2.5º) designed to use a shorter off set fork. It handles even better than the 2019 version, placing the rider more centrally, despite having the longer wheel base and the same travel as the 2018 Range (enduro) bike.

The Pump track bike: My 2012 Jackal is my pump track and farting around bike. I do not dirt jump (other than the kiddy line at the Riverside jumps) so it gets a fairly easy life. So many days in our riding year are spent on either my Chilcotin or Whistler bikes that this little gem might only get used for 30 days. It is well built (probably overly well built but it benefits from parts changes and the consequent trickle down from my other bikes), reliable and there is no sensible reason to replace it. There is something fun about having a “big kid’s” BMX bike (with gears and good brakes) that only these little bikes deliver so well.

The Fat Bike: After being advised not to ski (as a result of a knee injury/ surgery), and a season of incredibly high snowfall, which meant that even the trails in Squamish that normally remain rideable during the winter were not available, I had to do something bike related. In the interest of mine and everyone else’s sanity I found a fat bike being sold second hand for a fair price. There was no particular brand preference; simple, a fair price and available now was the selection criteria, which is not my normal way of deciding on a bike.

I promised myself that I was not going to tinker with it and avoid the every present challenge of “upgrade-itis”. I failed. I did not like the handle bars it came with so I swapped in some of my ‘spare’ parts and before I knew it it had an Answer Pro Taper carbon handlebar and a Raceface Turbine dropper post. It is a fun way to extend one’s riding season. I have had some good days out on this tank during the past two winters. Slow and fun and playing the snow. Perfect.